Holy Death

Holy Death, book 3 in the Inspector West series is now available for your reading pleasure.

Holy_Death_Cover_for_KindleMurder. Arson. Revenge.

Detective Inspector West investigates the grisly deaths of two elderly priests: one in a suspicious fire; the other obviously murdered.

The inspector is not the only one hunting the priest killer.

If you like murder mixed with mystery and conflict, you’ll probably love the suspense and intrigue in Peter Mulraney’s Holy Death, the third book in his Inspector West series

 

Grab yourself a copy from  Amazon | GooglePlay | iBooks Kobo Smashwords.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriend and Everyday Project Management.

Crime novels

Crime novels are written for entertainment.

The stories are more about people than crime. They are a way of exploring human behaviour.

Crime stories allow us to look at why people commit acts, like murder, and at the impact of those acts on others, especially the people tasked with bringing the perpetrators to justice.

Crime novels might allow us to understand why someone committed a crime, but they also provide us with a reassurance that crimes can be solved.

Crime stories, especially murder mysteries, are also a bit of a game between authors and readers.

An author wants to keep the suspense and mystery going to draw readers into the story. Readers not only want to be drawn into a story, they also want to work out who did it before the author reveals the identity of the killer.

The author has the advantage at the start, but needs to be careful not to give the game away too early. Readers need to be wary of the difference between genuine clues and red herrings to avoid being led down the garden path.

The fun for both parties is in revealing the identity of the villain towards the end of the story. That way, the author gets to tell the story and readers get to find out if they’ve solved the crime along with the investigating detective.

Crime novels allow us to walk on the dark side of the street from the safety of our favourite reading spot.

Inspector Westv3

Inspector West is nearly ready to entertain you again in a story of murder, arson and revenge.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriend and Everyday Project Management.

Progress report -Inspector West series book 3

Old Book

One thing I now know is – it takes a lot longer to write a murder mystery novel that to read one.

Book 3 in the Inspector West series is slowly taking shape. The first draft holds 22,500 words and, at around 700 words a day, it should be finished by the end of June. Then I’ll have to place it aside for a few weeks before I start on the first round of editing. At least one of my editing assistants will be on hand at that time, visiting from New York.

To date, Inspector West has started investigating the death of an elderly catholic priest and a fire that destroyed an aged care facility for retired priests, while the newly promoted Detective Sergeant Harry Fuller has been somewhat distracted by developments in his love life.

I’m writing to a plan, well a sketched outline really, so it’s always interesting watching the story unfold on the screen. I am always amazed by the way the mind works. I type a few words associated with what I think the storyline is and the story unfolds, almost by itself, as long as I keep typing.

I have to go write today’s 700 words.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.

Unsolved murders

holmesprofile2If you’re anything like me, you prefer a murder mystery to be solved by the time you get to the end of the book. Even if the sleuth doesn’t work it out, you expect the author to reveal who did the deed and why.

We just don’t like being left hanging, not knowing.

Solving murders is definitely one of those aspects of life which is stranger than fiction.

In South Australia, where I live, there are currently more than 100 unsolved murders on the books of SA Police, dating back to 1902. Apparently they never close a case until it’s solved.

Obviously, real investigators don’t enjoy the same level of success as some of our literary legends.

Perhaps we need a few more unresolved murder mysteries on the shelves.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter

 

Writing murder

Most of us do not commit murder, except in our fantasies.

It’s okay, you can admit to those murderous thoughts you’ve had about killing your boss, your spouse, that idiot that cut you off in traffic, or the one that got the promotion you know belonged to you.

Despite our best efforts to suppress our murderous intentions, sometimes we fail. If we’re lucky we stop ourselves or someone else stops us before it’s too late. Sometimes we commit murder.

I write about murder. In the first two novels of the Inspector West series, for example, close to a dozen characters lose their lives. Crime fiction is largely about murder, although it can delve into other types of crime.

It seems we like to read about people being murdered. Maybe, like me, you’re interested in why people commit murder, or how people deal with the impact of sudden loss in their lives. The other thing about crime writing that I find interesting is the impact of what appear to be the random intersections of different storylines.

Some crime readers are into what are known as police procedurals, addicted to following how the police go about their work in solving the crime. I’m not much into police procedures. I take a minimalist approach to how the police go about doing things. I’m more interested in the people involved in the investigation.

From my perspective, the plot needs to have a resolution. Storylines have to be pulled together in a way that does not leave the reader hanging – not knowing what happened or who did it. That does not necessarily mean that the crime has to be solved by the investigating officer.

After_Cover_for_Kindle

In After, the first book in the series, the story follows a murder mystery plot. Josie Ford is murdered and the story moves towards finding out who killed her and why.

 

The_Holiday_Cover_for_Kindle

In The Holiday, the second book in the series, the story follows a mystery suspense plot. Kieran Moore is killed and his grandson, Toby, is abducted. The identity of the killers is known to the reader at the time of the murder, and the story moves towards finding out Toby’s fate and whether the criminals will be caught or not.

What are you looking for when you’re reading a crime novel?

Did I get anywhere near the mark?

Thanks for dropping by, Peter

 

Crime and romance together

Murder MysteryThe stories in the Inspector West series are a blending of crime and romance stories.

You might wonder why anyone would write crime stories with a romance or love story theme.

As a Science and Maths student doing the compulsory English subject, I didn’t become a serious reader of fiction until after I had left school. That’s when I discovered I liked reading – when I didn’t have to write a critical essay on the book to satisfy some English teacher. Once I was free of all those school based expectations and prescribed reading lists, I started to read for enjoyment, as well as for learning.

I’ve been a reader ever since….and in my case we’re talking around forty-five years of reading. I’m writing this in my shed (or should I say library?) surrounded by several thousand books – and that’s not counting the hundreds of ebooks on my devices. Maybe I should confess to being addicted  to reading.

Peter in his library

I read a lot of book across several genres but I like mystery stories, especially murder mysteries – that scientific bent showing up trying to solve the riddle and work who did it before all is revealed. In recent years I’ve been reading Ian Rankin, Jo Nesbo, Louise Penny and Michael Robotham to name a few.

As a regular reader of this blog you’d also know I’m interested in personal growth and development, and development of that inner awareness that enables the journey. I’m also interested in relationships, because each of us lives within all kinds of relationships, so there are books by Deepak Chopra, Richard Rohr, Eckhart Tolle, Wayne Dyer, Gregg Braden and quite a few others on my bookshelves.

Bob Baker, one of my marketing mentors, claims that we write stories to educate, to entertain and to inspire.

I’m aiming to meet those lofty goals through exploring the lives of people entangled in the events of a crime.

Basically, I use the crime story as a framework around which to weave the stories of the people involved – the people committing the crime, the police officers trying to solve the crime and apprehend the killer (usually), and the people impacted by the crime, including the victim. They’re stories about ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances, with a touch of suspense or mystery thrown in.

In a lot of crime stories the detective is larger than life. Think Inspector Rebus or Harry Hole.

Inspector West isn’t one of those guys. He’s an ordinary guy with the same sort of relationship issues you and I might have, and he has his own love story, which you can read more about in The Holiday – a bit later in the year.

In After , I examine the relationships of the husband of the victim. I was intrigued by what it would be like not only having to deal with your wife being killed, but also having to cope with the unravelling of the facade of your relationship. I thought going down that rabbit hole might be a little more interesting than just doing the crime story on its own.

Love Story 2

Mind you, writing the crime stories so that readers want to find out who did it, and why, is a lot of fun.

Leave a comment to let us know what you think about this blend of stories.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter