Liminal Thinking

‘Liminal thinking is the art of creating change by understanding, shaping, and reframing beliefs.’

Ever wondered how you ended up with the belief set that’s controlling your view of the world?  I have and, fortunately, so has Dave Gray.

liminal-thinking

 

Dave’s written a book about it: Liminal Thinking.

He uses six principles to explain how beliefs shape everything, and gives us nine practices we can  use to do something about it.

The book is easy to read and understand. I love his illustrations – they might inspire me to try a few myself.

If you want to create some change in your life, do yourself a favour and get a copy of Dave’s book.

You can get an overview of its content and Dave’s philosophy of liminal thinking at liminalthinking.com.


Peter Mulraney is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriend and Everyday Project Management.

Transition

BridgeI’ve just started reading Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes by William Bridges.

He tells us life is full of change. No surprises there.

I learnt early in life that you can’t stop things changing, no matter how hard you try. Sometimes it really is outside your control.

As a boy, I had to cope with being uprooted and transplanted from one place to another every few years, as my father made his way up the ladder from being a teacher in a one room schoolhouse to a Class 1 Principal – as far as you could go without leaving the schoolyard for the big glass office in Adelaide.

I learnt to let go and move on. I learnt you could start over and make new friends.

A lot of us struggle with change. I certainly witnessed a lot of my colleagues resisting changes I was championing in the various workplaces I played in over the years.

According to Bridges, change itself isn’t the problem. It’s our failure to embrace the transition process required to weather the changes we experience.

He describes that transition process as being one of three phases: an ending, a neutral zone, and a new beginning.

From what I’ve read so far, it appears we experience difficulties with change when we don’t process the ending, ignore or get stuck in the neutral phase, and either rush into or resist a new beginning.

I’ve recently undertaken a big change. I retired from my day job after 40 1 (8)years in the workplace. I thought I had it all worked out. I was certainly looking forward to not going into the city to work everyday, and I had something new to go to: full-time writing.

 

Then it happened. All that regimentation, associated with getting up and going to work, and then coming home and spending a couple of hours writing every night, evaporated. I found myself in no-man’s land – that dreaded neutral zone. I had to reinvent my day. I had to work out what being a full-time writer actually meant, now that I’d decided to be one.

I’m still working on the finer points, but I’ve discovered that four hours is about the limit for creative writing. That leaves me with plenty of time to do all those other things I promised myself I’d do when I retired. I’ve even spent some time in the garden, but I won’t be firing the gardener anytime soon.

Maybe I should be thanking my wife for suggesting I read the book.

For your information

In Australia this week we changed the leader of our government.

  • No shots were fired.
  • No money changed hands.
  • There was no fighting in the streets.
  • There were no barrel bombs dropped from helicopters.
  • There were no police in riot gear firing tear gas canisters or rubber bullets.

It was just another peaceful day in paradise.

Books on the shelf

Cup and notebook on table

Sometimes you go to the bookshelf and pull out a book you’ve forgotten or perhaps never knew about – because someone else in your household bought it and put it on the shelf.

Today, I pulled down It’s Never Too Late….174 simple acts to change your life by Patrick Lindsay for a quiet read.

Here are a few of things he says it’s never too late for:

  • to be content
  • to wake up
  • to make new friends
  • to find out the facts
  • to start again
  • to make some quiet time.

If you’d like to explore it a little more, It’s Never Too Late is available from Amazon.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter

What story are you telling?

Stories

Every moment of every day is story time.

Take a moment and listen to that voice in your head.

What story are you telling yourself about yourself today?

Whether you’re aware of what you’re doing or not, you are telling your story all the time. You’re telling it in your self talk and when you’re telling others about yourself. You’re telling it in all those thoughts you have about yourself.

What story are you telling? Are you putting yourself down? Are you limiting your possibilities by saying that there are things you can’t do? Qualities you can’t have? Is your story the same as everybody else’s?

Are you deliberately crafting your story or simply repeating the same story over and over?

Who is the author of the stories you tell yourself about yourself?

Is it you?

You can be the author of your story but you need to make that a deliberate choice.

If you don’t pay attention to your storytelling you end up repeating things – mindlessly. Those things could be lies. They might have been true once, but there is a fair chance they are nothing more than opinions – that you have not consciously examined.

Here’s something to think about. If you keep telling the same story nothing changes. If you want things to change in your life you need to start telling a new story.

Start telling yourself the story of who you want to be – and grow into being that person.

You won’t change when things around you change.

Things around you change when you change – and you need to tell yourself a new story if you want to change.

I know this sounds easy but in reality it’s a real challenge – simply because we are creatures of habit. It’s so easy going with the flow of the familiar. It takes commitment to make a deliberate choice to change the narrative of your story and to stick with that choice.

You also have to contend with peer pressure – from those people who want you to stay the same.

The fun is in the changing not in the staying with the herd. So, go for it!

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.