Patience

1 (8)At times, your plans do not work out as envisioned. Sometimes that’s a good thing, and you get the opportunity to rethink or explore other ways of achieving your outcome.

I’m having one of those moments today. I’m working on producing a paperback with coloured pictures, and today I’ve discovered that Word does things to the resolution of images when you export the file to pdf that I hadn’t anticipated. So, it’s back to the drawing board, so to speak.

The question I found myself pondering this morning was how could I produce that pdf file with images at 300 dpi instead of the 72 dpi that Word for Mac wants to play with? A little online research at CreateSpace unearthed some useful advice with various suggestions, which I duly explored across the print to pdf options on my computer – to no avail.

After a deep breathing pause, I remembered that a few years ago I had purchased the iStudio Publisher app, in one of my curious moments, so I opened it up and read the help files, and there it was – the answer.

Now I’m finding out how the app works, so I can produce that pdf with images at 300 dpi. Patience required.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic and The New Girlfriend. He has also published colouring books and journals under the Sharing the Journey banner.

On being a mystic

San-Francisco-de-Asis

Once upon a time, I thought that being a mystic was all about prayer, fasting and meditation – and living in the spiritual realms of existence.

You know, being a living saint like, say, Francis of Assisi or a modern day holy man like Bede Griffiths.

No wonder I was a little reluctant to heed the call. I mean, who wants to live like that?

I was misinformed.

Sure, some mystics might pray, meditate and fast – but being a mystic is about being fully engaged in the life you’re living here on planet earth – otherwise you wouldn’t be here.

It’s not about escaping to some cloud of unknowing or any other nirvana. No, it’s about finding out who you are and why you’re here – this time.

The challenge is to be present and aware – and that’s how you become a mystic.

Meditation helps you become aware but you need to choose to be present.

It’s amazing what you notice when you’re aware of the filters in your mind and you choose to be in the present moment.

You won’t know what it’s like until you give it a go.

It’s as easy as breathing.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.