Holy Death

Holy Death, book 3 in the Inspector West series is now available for your reading pleasure.

Holy_Death_Cover_for_KindleMurder. Arson. Revenge.

Detective Inspector West investigates the grisly deaths of two elderly priests: one in a suspicious fire; the other obviously murdered.

The inspector is not the only one hunting the priest killer.

If you like murder mixed with mystery and conflict, you’ll probably love the suspense and intrigue in Peter Mulraney’s Holy Death, the third book in his Inspector West series

 

Grab yourself a copy from  Amazon | GooglePlay | iBooks Kobo Smashwords.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriend and Everyday Project Management.

Crime novels

Crime novels are written for entertainment.

The stories are more about people than crime. They are a way of exploring human behaviour.

Crime stories allow us to look at why people commit acts, like murder, and at the impact of those acts on others, especially the people tasked with bringing the perpetrators to justice.

Crime novels might allow us to understand why someone committed a crime, but they also provide us with a reassurance that crimes can be solved.

Crime stories, especially murder mysteries, are also a bit of a game between authors and readers.

An author wants to keep the suspense and mystery going to draw readers into the story. Readers not only want to be drawn into a story, they also want to work out who did it before the author reveals the identity of the killer.

The author has the advantage at the start, but needs to be careful not to give the game away too early. Readers need to be wary of the difference between genuine clues and red herrings to avoid being led down the garden path.

The fun for both parties is in revealing the identity of the villain towards the end of the story. That way, the author gets to tell the story and readers get to find out if they’ve solved the crime along with the investigating detective.

Crime novels allow us to walk on the dark side of the street from the safety of our favourite reading spot.

Inspector Westv3

Inspector West is nearly ready to entertain you again in a story of murder, arson and revenge.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriend and Everyday Project Management.

Patience

1 (8)At times, your plans do not work out as envisioned. Sometimes that’s a good thing, and you get the opportunity to rethink or explore other ways of achieving your outcome.

I’m having one of those moments today. I’m working on producing a paperback with coloured pictures, and today I’ve discovered that Word does things to the resolution of images when you export the file to pdf that I hadn’t anticipated. So, it’s back to the drawing board, so to speak.

The question I found myself pondering this morning was how could I produce that pdf file with images at 300 dpi instead of the 72 dpi that Word for Mac wants to play with? A little online research at CreateSpace unearthed some useful advice with various suggestions, which I duly explored across the print to pdf options on my computer – to no avail.

After a deep breathing pause, I remembered that a few years ago I had purchased the iStudio Publisher app, in one of my curious moments, so I opened it up and read the help files, and there it was – the answer.

Now I’m finding out how the app works, so I can produce that pdf with images at 300 dpi. Patience required.


IMG_0156Peter Mulraney is a creative writer from Australia. He is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic and The New Girlfriend. He has also published colouring books and journals under the Sharing the Journey banner.

Melissa Lane Girl Detective

Here’s something a little different.

One of my friends from Crime Writers SA, Reece Pocock, has written a detective story for 7 to 11 year olds: Melissa Lane Girl Detective: In the case of the stolen lunch money.

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Something to consider if you have some young readers at your place looking for something to read on their Kindle or iPad. Be interested to know what they think of it – I’m sure Reece would.

 

Iced

City bus stopShe waited at the bus stop, alone. He knew the bus would arrive in five minutes. She ignored him. He felt the need for ice from deep within his psyche. She read the romance she had downloaded the previous evening. He saw his target and executed his attack.

She grabbed his arm as he snatched her smartphone. He lost his balance and staggered onto the road. She screamed. He failed to look before crossing. The car did not stop, until after his head had hit the windscreen and then the road.

Her smartphone was broken.

His deep craving was iced.

Dying days

They spent hours strolling along the beach in the dying days of summer.

What are dying days?

In the context of the sentence above, they are the dwindling days or the last days of summer. They represent that period of transition from the pleasant season of summer to the chill winds of autumn – announcing the imminent approach of winter coldness.

They’re romantic sounding words, evoking images of warm evenings, gentle breezes, and a foreboding of things coming to an end. These are the days we do not want to end.

Summer1

Dying days take on a more sinister tone within the context of a murder mystery, where we often find ourselves dealing with an examination of the days leading up to someone’s untimely death. Now there’s another interesting description – untimely death.

Death is, after all, a natural event but we generally only regard it as timely when it occurs naturally, that is without assistance from an outside force – like a blunt instrument being applied to the head.

I wonder what each of us would do differently if we knew we were living our dying days, that dwindling number of days leading up to our untimely death.

Isn’t it intriguing how we live as if we will be here forever?

Yet we all know that there will come a day when we aren’t living our dying days but our dying day.

It’s fascinating reading about someone else’s untimely death within the context of a crime novel, and consoling to know that crimes can be solved and justice applied, but what is it that attracts us to this genre?

As a writer, it’s about creating a web of intrigue based on the darker side of life, taking myself into places in words that I would never go into in life. In the last week, for example, I have spent my nights plotting and then executing a triple murder – all without leaving the house or picking up a weapon.

I wonder why people do things like kill their partner. And, when you read real crime stories as opposed to crime fiction, you discover that people do things for very trivial reasons.

Maybe we read crime because fictional crime is more exciting than the real stuff.

What do you think?

Middle class crime in the suburbs

Last week I enjoyed reading Cold Granite, Book 1 in the Logan McRae series, by Stuart MacBride, on my daily commute.

A couple of things caught my attention.

The story is set in Aberdeen, Scotland, during December, so it rains on nearly every page. This is not something we have to deal with in Australia, where if it rains during a story, it might be once in the entire book. Australians are used to foul deeds being committed in fine weather. We know a lot more about drought than deluge, despite a few recent skirmishes with floods, hail storms and cyclones. The evidence is more likely to be destroyed by fire than water down here.

burglarThe world of crime depicted by MacBride in Cold Granite is one where the criminals can only be described as social misfits from the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum.

On reflection, I realised that my Inspector West series is definitely middle class crime. I wonder if I am taking that advice to write about what I know – middle class life in the suburbs – too literally.

How do you like your crime? Do you want your criminals to be socially inept, mentally challenged misfits? Or do you prefer them to be people like you who, for one reason or another, find themselves on the wrong side of the law?

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.

 

Lost

Don’t you just love the English language? So many words to play with. Let’s take a look at one: lost.

This is one of those words with multiple meanings depending on how you use it.

image‘I am lost.‘ I have no idea where I am geographically is one meaning but we also say this when we mean I don’t follow your meaning or I have no idea what you’re talking about.

‘I lost.’ We might say this at the end of a competitive encounter like a game or an argument to signify that we didn’t win or that we were defeated. Or maybe after a wager or a punt on the horses to indicate we handed over our money for naught.

‘I’ve lost my keys.’ You might say this little phrase just before you utter that enduring life question I mentioned a few posts back. In that context lost means misplaced, because invariably you find them – eventually.

‘All is lost!’ This might mean I’m ruined financially or that there is no longer any hope of my plans coming to fruition.

‘Get lost!’ This is the one we use when we want someone to remove themselves from our sight.

‘I lost it!’ For those times when you lose control of yourself and say or do a few things you’ll probably regret later.

No wonder people have trouble learning English as a second language. Most of us have enough trouble learning it as our mother tongue or native language.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter